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Your Estate Plan's Quarterback

How to Choose a Personal Representative

Your estate plan is the combination of documents that determine how your assets will be managed and distributed. When you create this plan, one of the most helpful things you can do for your family and beneficiaries is to spell out in detail how you want your estate to be handled.

A critical part of that process is naming an executor, known as a personal representative in many states. The representative holds an important job, serving as the quarterback of the estate settlement process. It is essential to entrust the right person to oversee the execution of the terms outlined in your will.

The Basics of a Personal Representative

If being a personal representative of a will seems like a big responsibility, that’s because it is. When it comes time to choose that person, you should pick someone responsible, organized and trustworthy. Common choices for an executor are a spouse, an adult child, a sibling or a close friend.

Your personal representative undertakes many important responsibilities, including:

  • Notifying all interested parties and agencies of your death.
  • Paying creditors and outstanding taxes.
  • Distributing your assets according to your will.

The Best Person for the Job

When selecting a personal representative, the most important consideration is whether the person can handle the various responsibilities of administering your estate. Many people select an executor based on their relationship to the person. This can quickly become disastrous when that person discovers that he or she is not suitable for the work.

If you don’t have a friend or relative you trust to complete these duties in a satisfactory manner, don’t worry. You could name a bank or trust company to handle these matters, for a fee. Many banks have experience administering estates, particularly larger ones.

Importantly, be sure to ask your selected representative before you name them as your executor. Ensure that they agree they’re up to the task.

Make an Impact Through Your Plan

Contact Lisa Dennison at ldennison@nhspca.org or 603-772-2921 to discuss ways to extend your support for the New Hampshire SPCA through your estate plan.

The New Hampshire Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

PO Box 196
104 Portsmouth Avenue
Stratham, NH 03885

Hours

Adoption Center

11AM to 4PM – Friday through Monday
11AM to 7PM – Tuesday & Thursday
Closed Wednesday

Learning Center

Open for Programing Hours

Business Hours

9AM to 5PM – Monday through Friday

Contact

Lisa Dennison

Executive Director
603-772-2921 (ext. 107)
ldennison@nhspca.org

Shelia Ryan

Director of Development & Marketing
603-772-2921 (ext. 106)
sryan@nhspca.org

The information on this website is not intended as legal or tax advice. For such advice, please consult an attorney or tax advisor. Figures cited in examples are for illustrative purposes only. References to tax rates include federal taxes only and are subject to change. State law may further impact your individual results. Annuities are subject to regulation by the State of California. Payments under such agreements, however, are not protected or otherwise guaranteed by any government agency or the California Life and Health Insurance Guarantee Association. A charitable gift annuity is not regulated by the Oklahoma Insurance Department and is not protected by a guaranty association affiliated with the Oklahoma Insurance Department. Charitable gift annuities are not regulated by and are not under the jurisdiction of the South Dakota Division of Insurance.